A Few Seconds of Panic: A 5-Foot-8, 170-Pound, 43-Year-Old


  • Hardcover
  • 338 pages
  • A Few Seconds of Panic: A 5-Foot-8, 170-Pound, 43-Year-Old Sportswriter Plays in the NFL
  • Stefan Fatsis
  • English
  • 20 February 2019
  • 1594201781

10 thoughts on “A Few Seconds of Panic: A 5-Foot-8, 170-Pound, 43-Year-Old Sportswriter Plays in the NFL

  1. says:

    I can t remember the last time I watched a football game I think it was when I was in elementary school.Even though I can t claim a team or quote stats, I was fascinated by this book The biggest takeaway was this Professional football players are just people. They re great athletes, but have insecure jobs and tons of stress Fatsis s title, A Few Seconds of Panic, can be applied to the entire cadre of pro ballers, as long as it s changed to A Lifetime of Panic Fatsis is a great writer, I can t remember the last time I watched a football game I think it was when I was in elementary school.Even though I can t claim a team or quote stats, I was fascinated by this book The biggest takeaway was this Professional football players are just people. They re great athletes, but have insecure jobs and tons of stress Fatsis s title, A Few Seconds of Panic, can be applied to the entire cadre of pro ballers, as long as it s changed to A Lifetime of Panic Fatsis is a great writer, an even better reporter, and a really innovative researcher His book is a insider s scoop to the NFL Few others have been or will be able to create anything similar


  2. says:

    Since I rarely read nonfiction books, when I do I expect them to be real winners just like this true story of a 43 year old sportswriter who decides to experience the life of an NFL football player by going through Broncos training camp as a field goal kicker Not only was it the story of one man s attempt to be a professional athlete, it was also an inside look at the players and management of professional football.Just like when I read a book that was a year in the life of the Professional Bul Since I rarely read nonfiction books, when I do I expect them to be real winners just like this true story of a 43 year old sportswriter who decides to experience the life of an NFL football player by going through Broncos training camp as a field goal kicker Not only was it the story of one man s attempt to be a professional athlete, it was also an inside look at the players and management of professional football.Just like when I read a book that was a year in the life of the Professional Bull Riding Association I was tempted throughout the book to Google the various players to find out how they were doing today Many of the players Fatsis encounters are trying to overcome the odds to secure one spot on the team s final roster Along with the physical toll the game takes on the players bodies, the mental games that are played by coaches and team owners is depicted Not only do I have a different view of professional football players I also wonder what I could do if I showed the determination of Fatsis Professional bowling, maybe Well, I probably should just aim for a consistent 200 game That would be amazing enough


  3. says:

    I read Stefan Fatsis s Word Freak a few years ago and enjoyed it, and I m a casual football fan, so when I saw this at the library, I thought it might be a good read I was right In addition to the interesting inside look at the running of a football team, I also got a humbling reminder that football players are human They get frustrated with their bosses and with the repetition of the daily grind, just like we all do They struggle with the capriciousness of the NFL when it comes to their e I read Stefan Fatsis s Word Freak a few years ago and enjoyed it, and I m a casual football fan, so when I saw this at the library, I thought it might be a good read I was right In addition to the interesting inside look at the running of a football team, I also got a humbling reminder that football players are human They get frustrated with their bosses and with the repetition of the daily grind, just like we all do They struggle with the capriciousness of the NFL when it comes to their employment Most surprisingly, I discovered that they re not all spoiled millionaires many of the unknowns earn only a couple hundred thousand dollars a year, and the ones who bounce from practice squad to practice squad sometimes earn less than they could make flipping burgers at McDonald s.Even if you don t know the first thing about American football, read it for the universal stories of chasing dreams and of realizing that sometimes hard work and perseverance doesn t mean you get the prize


  4. says:

    Fatsis is a professional writer and journalist whose first book Word Freak a documentary about the subculture of competitive Scrabble, professional Scrabble players, and Fatsis attempt at succeeding at competitive Scrabble I enjoyed A Few Seconds of Panic follows the Word Freak mold put yourself in the shoes of the people you are covering in order to better understand their mindset and their world Fatsis joins the Denver Broncos in 2006 as a kicker and spends preseason camp and training ca Fatsis is a professional writer and journalist whose first book Word Freak a documentary about the subculture of competitive Scrabble, professional Scrabble players, and Fatsis attempt at succeeding at competitive Scrabble I enjoyed A Few Seconds of Panic follows the Word Freak mold put yourself in the shoes of the people you are covering in order to better understand their mindset and their world Fatsis joins the Denver Broncos in 2006 as a kicker and spends preseason camp and training camp learning the ins and outs of kicking field goals, and in the process gives us a first hand account of what life is like as a marginal NFL player Fatsis succeeds in his endeavor, as I found the book very engaging and informative From the idea of the book inspired by Plimpton s Paper Lion to initial efforts to learn the basics hiring a local professional kicking instructor to training camp to leaving the team right before the start of the real season, Fatsis was able to draw me into his personal journey He fills the book with character profiles of both the famous Jake Plummer to the anonymous practice squad players and fourth string kickers He does a sound job of conveying the harsh reality of an NFL training camp both the physical demands and the mental demands the stress of competing with others for a job, the fear of being cut, the way NFL coaches and front office personnel make the players feel like disposable widgets, etc Fatsis draws the reader in so well that during one scene where he is asked to kick a field goal in front of the whole Broncos team, I was personally invested in whether or not he was going to make the field goal In Word Freak, I felt like he put himself too much as the central figure of the book in A Few Seconds of Panic, that isn t so much as true football as a game and as a business is clearly the central figure Great balance in his writing, a good mix of both personal insight and objective observation, and engaging writing everything you want in a non fiction read Highly recommended


  5. says:

    Like almost all books about journalists inserting themselves into situations, the author isn t nearly as interesting as the people who surround them Did I care about Stefan Fatsis s personal journey to be a kicker Not really aside from his battle with the NFL to let him kick in a game I m not a forty year old dad with two knee surgeries, though However, I found his portraits of the players to be very illuminating It became clear that when we watch games as fans, we basically have no idea Like almost all books about journalists inserting themselves into situations, the author isn t nearly as interesting as the people who surround them Did I care about Stefan Fatsis s personal journey to be a kicker Not really aside from his battle with the NFL to let him kick in a game I m not a forty year old dad with two knee surgeries, though However, I found his portraits of the players to be very illuminating It became clear that when we watch games as fans, we basically have no idea what s happening outside of a basic surface appreciation Then we blame the players or the coaches, pretending that we are the experts Some players were meatheads, others were brilliant, others were headcases, etc At the end of the day, they were all very human There is a line in the book from the player who says that football is a really shitty job that pays really well I think that s my new favorite description of it.It s weird to read about Jay Cutler being the next big thing because in the year 2016 we all know he sucks


  6. says:

    A wonderful, insightful book covering the author s stint as an aspiring kicker with the pre season Denver Broncos Fatsis writes about his struggle to develop his kicking skills, the business of football, the players, coaches and their personalities, and generally the NFL life I who, admittedly don t know much about football learned a lot.


  7. says:

    Fantastic story about a sportswriter who spent three months with the Denver Broncos organization, as a kicker Hilarious, true, and often heartbreakingly sad about the realities of professional football as a career.


  8. says:

    The guys have been passing this one around it was very interesting It definitely shed some new light on the sports industry in general, especially the NFL It made me feel differently about the average NFL player that is, those whose names you will probably never hear of.


  9. says:

    This was a great book to listen to It gave great insight into the lives of the average NFL players, not the multi millionaires, and the daily pain involved in the life of a professional athlete Plus, the author is extremely entertaining.


  10. says:

    This is a fun book, and an engaging inside look at an NFL locker room I have to admire Fatsis s guts in taking on this project, and the way he did it And as he surely hoped when the project began, he did manage to find out a good deal about individual players as well as the whole NFL culture A bit surprisingly, but nicely, he was eventually accepted by the real players, not quite as one of their own but certainly if nothing else as a honorary member of the club Just like his hero and predec This is a fun book, and an engaging inside look at an NFL locker room I have to admire Fatsis s guts in taking on this project, and the way he did it And as he surely hoped when the project began, he did manage to find out a good deal about individual players as well as the whole NFL culture A bit surprisingly, but nicely, he was eventually accepted by the real players, not quite as one of their own but certainly if nothing else as a honorary member of the club Just like his hero and predecessor George Plimpton discovered when he carried out the participatory experiment for his famous Paper Lion book, Fatsis learns that the players are not at all the one dimensional simpletons or icons that fans or detractors might want them to be I highly recommend


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A Few Seconds of Panic: A 5-Foot-8, 170-Pound, 43-Year-Old Sportswriter Plays in the NFL An insightful andamusing look at the inner workings of pro football The New York Times from the bestselling author of Word Freak In Word Freak, Stefan Fatsis invaded the insular world of competitive Scrabble players, ultimately achieving an expert level ranking Now, in his new book, he infiltrates a strikingly different subculture pro football Afterthan


About the Author: Stefan Fatsis

Stefan Fatsis is an author, reporter and familiar voice to public radio listeners nationwide.