NeuroLogic: The Brain's Hidden Rationale Behind Our


NeuroLogic: The Brain's Hidden Rationale Behind Our Irrational Behavior Fascinating This book delves into current brain research, going between case studies and internal scans The various topics seem only loosely connected until the end, when they are brought together in an examination of self Highly recommended, this copy will be returned to the library but I will be purchasing soon.I started this and fell behind events my month of reading is in no way indicative of the content This book is not over simplified, but is still completely accessible It contains Fascinating This book delves into current brain research, going between case studies and internal scans The various topics seem only loosely connected until the end, when they are brought together in an examination of self Highly recommended, this copy will be returned to the library but I will be purchasing soon.I started this and fell behind events my month of reading is in no way indicative of the content This book is not over simplified, but is still completely accessible It contains an extensive bibliography and index, along with end notes Just before all of those are some excellent brain maps I just wish they were inside the dust jacket for easier use Fascinating for people who have no background in abnormal psychology, this book tours brain disorders to learnabout the logic of the unconscious and the self If you do have a psychology background, some of the stories are old hat for example, the author discusses the Stroop effect at length but also brings upcurrent info about experiments that you may not know like how the Stroop effect is lessened during hypnosis, and what that implies towards dissociative disorder and convers Fascinating for people who have no background in abnormal psychology, this book tours brain disorders to learnabout the logic of the unconscious and the self If you do have a psychology background, some of the stories are old hat for example, the author discusses the Stroop effect at length but also brings upcurrent info about experiments that you may not know like how the Stroop effect is lessened during hypnosis, and what that implies towards dissociative disorder and conversion disorder The overall effect is that through learning about the disorders, you get particular insight into how the brain functions, how the personal narrative of a person is important, and what that means towards a meaning of self Highly recommended I cannot describe how amazing this book is, it was perfect, it spoke very clearly about every point and even detoured a little to make the big picture perfectly clear I ve contemplated Neuroscience as s profession in the future before, and I ve had thoughts like maybe it isn t for me this book was a great introduction into what seems like a huge mysterious world, and it was the perfect book for me I liked how it didn t assume the reader knew everything, this could be real by anyone and I cannot describe how amazing this book is, it was perfect, it spoke very clearly about every point and even detoured a little to make the big picture perfectly clear I ve contemplated Neuroscience as s profession in the future before, and I ve had thoughts like maybe it isn t for me this book was a great introduction into what seems like a huge mysterious world, and it was the perfect book for me I liked how it didn t assume the reader knew everything, this could be real by anyone and it would still be well understood and I loved that The topics this book focused on were beyond interesting, even the ones that seemed not so interesting in the beginning turned out to be mind blowing I ll definitely revisit this book hopefully multiple times in the future, because it s not the type of book that should be read once for as fascinating and compelling a subject as neuroscience is, it s likely nigh impossible for any book on the subject to be dull eliezer sternberg, a resident neurologist at yale new haven hospital, covers a wide range of cognitive science related topics in his new book, neurologic the brain s hidden rationale behind our irrational behavior seeking an understanding of the myriad processes and functions at work within our brains, sternberg offers an equal mix of research, anecdote, extrapola for as fascinating and compelling a subject as neuroscience is, it s likely nigh impossible for any book on the subject to be dull eliezer sternberg, a resident neurologist at yale new haven hospital, covers a wide range of cognitive science related topics in his new book, neurologic the brain s hidden rationale behind our irrational behavior seeking an understanding of the myriad processes and functions at work within our brains, sternberg offers an equal mix of research, anecdote, extrapolation, and interpretation from memory, cognition, mental illness, paranormal religious experiences, trauma, learning, executive function, attention, hypnosis, perception, hallucinations, identity, selfhood, empathy, compassion, motor control, dreams, bias, and so much , neurologic provides an engrossing look at a rapidly developing discipline that incorporates the interaction of conscious and unconscious systems in the brain neurologic, perhaps like the best of books, whets the appetite while simultaneously sating the intellect each chapter or vignette could easily be reworked into a longer piece, but by flitting upon so many obviously interrelated subjects, sternberg allows a comprehensive or as much of one as may currently be said to exist pattern to emerge one which amply demonstrates the complexity and character of our most enigmatic of organs neurologic is an engaging, captivating read, one likely to appeal equally to both neuroscience neophytes and those alreadyfamiliar with some of the subject s most important concepts and developments there is an underlying logic to the way the brain interprets our experiences, encodes our memories, and writes our history the unconscious system creates connections between various snapshots in our lives, it monitors our emotions at each moment to decide what to emphasize, and it organizes those snapshots in such a way as to tell a story that is unified, straightforward, and, most of all, personal and intimate that story becomes our conscious life.when parts of the story are missing, however, whether due to brain damage or the confusing nature of an experience, the brain follows the same logical protocol to fill the holes just as we might fill in a puzzle with missing pieces, the unconscious brain searches for fragments of memories and ideas, borrowing from our vast bank of knowledge, that fit most neatly and convincingly always the egocentric storyteller, the brain relies on our beliefs and personal perspectives, our hopes and fears, to guide its task of inscribing the ploy as we might imagine, however, thesevere the gap in the memory system or theconfusing the experience, the deeper the brain will have to reach to spin its narrative to outsiders, the story the brain tells in those cases may seem, well, a little weird. This has to be one of the most readable and informative works on this subject ever written Thankfully, Sternberg doesn t over simplify in his effort to make this readable for the layman and the sheer amount of detail is incredibly stimulating He is extremely thorough but moves through all of this material at a perfect pace I had to read in one sitting I was so hooked, absolutely required reading for anyone interested in the workings of the brain mind. Pop sci book on my field, cognitive neuroscience As such, I found I was familiar with most of the material, which is why I give it 3 stars rather than the 4 it probably objectively deserves It was a really good overview of some interesting aspects of the field, some of which I bring up in conversation, but it was fundamentally pop which meant that a lot of details were smoothed over, inaccuracies were given for the sake of simplicity, and random jargon was inserted to keep things authoritati Pop sci book on my field, cognitive neuroscience As such, I found I was familiar with most of the material, which is why I give it 3 stars rather than the 4 it probably objectively deserves It was a really good overview of some interesting aspects of the field, some of which I bring up in conversation, but it was fundamentally pop which meant that a lot of details were smoothed over, inaccuracies were given for the sake of simplicity, and random jargon was inserted to keep things authoritative without being informative My main issue with the book on an objective level is that it had a good idea, to cover the ways in which the brain fills the gaps , but while the sources are all there, the author doesn t dedicate enough time to properly weave the thread together, explain the big picture, etc A better introduction would have done the trick As such, it just seems like a collection of anecdotal research, when in reality the book has in common how the brain figures out the world with missing information Very little original content analysis on the part of the author I really enjoyed reading this book, especially as it explained in a very easy to follow manner how the brain works Sternberg obviously put a lot of research into this book, and his use of case studies made it muchattainable to understand the different neurological diseases described in the book There were loads of interesting facts as well, and my favorite was learning that schizophrenic patients have the ability to tickle themselves A groundbreaking investigation of the brain s hidden logic behind our strangest behaviors, and of how conscious and unconscious systems interact in order to create our experience and preserve our sense of self From bizarre dreams and hallucinations to schizophrenia and multiple personalities, the human brain is responsible for a diverse spectrum of strange thoughts and behaviors When observed from the outside, these phenomena are often written off as being just crazy, but what if they were actually planned and logical NeuroLogic explores the brain s internal system of reasoning, from its unconscious depths to conscious decision making, and illuminates how it explains our most outlandish as well as our most stereotyped behaviors From sleepwalking murderers, contagious yawning, and the brains of sports fans to false memories, subliminal messages, and the secret of ticklishness, Dr Eliezer Sternberg shows that there are patterns to the way the brain interprets the world patterns that fit the brain s unique logic Unraveling these patterns and the various ways they can be disturbed will not only alter our view of mental illness and supernatural experience, but will also shed light on the hidden parts of ourselves With black and white illustrations throughout From the Hardcover edition Good book to read during 9h flight Short and fascinating. There is a peculiar problem with neuroscience just now, and NeuroLogic is able to dance over, under, and around it The problem is that we are starting to learn just enough about how the brain not just the mind works, to be dangerous Previously, attempts such as phrenology to use what was known about the brain to form opinions about human behavior, were so comically off base as to be relatively easy to debunk Now, we have learned enough about certain phenomena such as schizophrenics hearing There is a peculiar problem with neuroscience just now, and NeuroLogic is able to dance over, under, and around it The problem is that we are starting to learn just enough about how the brain not just the mind works, to be dangerous Previously, attempts such as phrenology to use what was known about the brain to form opinions about human behavior, were so comically off base as to be relatively easy to debunk Now, we have learned enough about certain phenomena such as schizophrenics hearing voices, phantom limb pain, multiple personalities, and so forth, that we could plausibly have some useful insights into these maladies that came from analysis of the brain as a physical organ, rather than just from introspection or other mind based methods such as talk therapy.But, we don t really, truly know enough to be making many important decisions based on brain science yet For example, what if anything the significance of mirror neurons is, is itself a topic of somewhat fierce debate among the best informed neuroscientists How to interpret fMRI brain scans, for a given individual, is so far from consensus that it should not be used for anything other than basic research Yet, we find that society is not always willing to wait for scientists to come to a firm conclusion on a topic, before it begins to apply what is known As has often been said, it s not what we don t know that is most dangerous, it is what we know that isn t actually true Scientists may wish that criminal court cases were not seeing brain scans admitted as evidence, but they are not able to actually prevent it.Given the state of neuroscience today, it is important for people like Sternberg, a resident neurologist at Yale New Haven Hospital, to take the time to make a book like NeuroLogic for the rest of us It is very good at connecting every bit of brain science covered, toimmediately relatable topics such as why I can remember where I live to drive home, but cannot remember to pick up a gallon of milk at the grocery store on the way Or, why we can remember things that never happened Or, why yawning is contagious Or, why mentally practicing i.e imagining a physical action such as a golf stroke or playing the piano can make us actually do it better.Sternberg does not hesitate to use a diagram, chart, or picture when it will help, and he doesn t overwhelm us with latin names for the different brain areas He also knows how to weave less common behaviors such as memories of alien abduction, into the thread of the book, to help illustrate the central concepts.Of course, I cannot evaluate how good or bad Sternberg s technical acumen is To an interested layman like me, he sounds like he knows what he s talking about He also cites a lot of other basic research in support of his viewpoint, and he is ready to admit where the available evidence leaves room for doubt e.g mirror neurons, repressed memories But as a highly readable look at the part of you that isyou than any other part, it s a great look at what is known, and what is not yet known

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